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When I first began my interior design practice in 2003, I put on a tough exterior.

I dressed in pressed suits and always gave my clients an over-abundance of written information neatly tucked into a white folder I left with them at the end of every first meeting.

I gave the appearance of a masculine well-put-together woman who rarely if ever shared the stories about her own vulnerabilities and personal experiences.

When my clients shared their unique challenges and struggles, I felt touched and wanted to share examples of my own wisdom, but I kept quiet.

I was under the assumption the more corporate I was viewed on the outside, the higher the respect on the inside.

That all changed within the first year of my business.

One day I decided that instead of overwhelming my clients with written information that often left them with that deer in the headlights look, I would show up as my authentic self and stop hiding behind a mask.

This meant talking less, listening more, and handing out less written materials.

When I became more vulnerable, everything changed in my business for the better.

I was more present and my clients began to relate to me in a different way. They began to trust I understood their unique challenges, not just because of my extensive training, but rather because of my own life experiences.

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Why am I sharing this with you today?

A revolution in healthcare is now underway.

Doctors and healthcare practitioners are no longer seen as scary women and men in white coats who simply deliver us information and then leave.

You, dear healer, are now considered and viewed as a partner in your patient and client’s recovery, and continued well-being.

Your compassion and time spent with each and every person you work with to bring them to their highest health is deeply appreciated.

And when you design the environment within your practice to reflect this trust and connection—by offering a nurturing space where patients feel safe and supported in their healing journey–you seal the deal.

Get started here.

Yours Wholeheartedly,

Cheryl
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HOW DO I DESIGN A WAITING ROOM THAT KEEPS MY PATIENTS COMING BACK?
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