Dear Ones,

I recently helped an extremely gifted acupuncturist transform her treatment room into a space she and her patients now melt into, like honey over a warm piece of toast.

I came to her as a patient and although I loved her treatments, I had an extremely difficult time feeling at ease in her treatment room.

The walls were painted an irritating yellow, my chair in her intake area was facing the door [making me feel all kinds of unsafe] and the position of the treatment table was all wrong and made me feel like I was hanging upside down like a baby just born about to be smacked in the tush by a male doctor in a 1950’s hospital birth.

Yeah, not good.

And, yeah, while I’m certainly on the sensitive end of the spectrum when it comes to how I feel in spaces, I also knew with 100% certainty that I wasn’t the only patient who was experiencing these same feelings.

After the appointment, I gently approached my acupuncturist about the subject of redesigning her treatment room to see if she would bite.

She jumped right in and scheduled a wellness design session and well…. you know the rest.

After she implemented the new design, the room and the energy in the room was transformed into an oasis.

The very next week, my client’s patients starting coming forward to share how they felt about the new space and the extraordinary improvements in how they experienced their acupuncture treatments in the room.

Here’s the thing:

As a general rule, your patients and clients will not tell you what they don’t like about your space, even when you ask.

It is culturally inappropriate [in the United States, anyway] to tell your doctor or wellness practitioner what’s bothering you about the exam or treatment room, your medical office or waiting room.

And so we generally don’t do it. We try to be nice that way.

Even I, a healthcare interior designer, make sure to be very careful and respectful when I approach the subject with wellness-preneurs.

But, just know this: Even though your patient and client peeps are not saying anything, it doesn’t mean they aren’t feeling the vibe [good or bad] in your wellness space.

In the US right now, about 30% of the population spends their dollars on health and wellness care outside of the insurance system. That’s many millions and growing.

Your patients speak with their wallets.

If you have that nagging feeling in your gut that it’s time to redesign your treatment room, waiting room or other healthcare setting, get started here:

http://cheryljanisdesigns.com/the-color-cure-book/

Your Biggest Supporter,

Cheryl
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WHAT PAINT COLORS ARE BEST FOR MY WELLNESS SPACE?
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