Select Page

List member Janel recently emailed me this question:

“I’m looking at a new shared space with other health wellness individuals. My question is there is one space with big tall natural light windows but it’s next to the reception area and another in the back left corner with tall ceiling and beautiful beams but no natural light. Which space is the better space to secure?”

This is a fabulous question and I’m excited to share my answer here.

Here’s my big answer: “It depends.”

It depends on which issues are most important to you.

For example, if sound management is a problem in the clinic, the room with big, tall windows will not help your clients feel cozy and safe with a funnel of noise coming in from the reception area. 😳

However, if the treatment room is fairly sound proof, meaning it’s normally on the quiet side, then all that natural light flooding in could be your best friend, delighting you and your clients with sun drenched goodness. 😌

Of course, my next question to you is what are the views like out that window? For example, if what your patient sees is a parking lot and a bunch of cement and cars staring back at them, I’d say that could be a deal breaker.

Now, those views could easily be changed and improved by placing, for example, a large bamboo plant in a pretty pot just outside the window or asking your landlady if you can create a mini-garden outside. Now we’re talkin’. 👍🏼

Even with just a few plants outside that window, you can create a healing view which contributes to making your patients and clients feel oh-so-good.

So, if the treatment room with the window is quiet and not much noise can be heard while inside the room with the door closed, and you have (at least) a small pretty view outside your window, go with the window over the windowless room.

Now, let’s talk about the other treatment room in the back left corner with tall ceiling and beautiful beams but no natural light, aka the windowless room.

3 reasons the windowless room would work better than the front room next to the reception with the window:

#1 – The room is at least 60% quieter. As I mentioned before, noise interruptions will send your clients (and patients) running for the hills and looking for another practitioner that does what you do and offers a more serene experience.

#2 – If you offer something like acupuncture or massage and you want to create a womb-like healing experience, a windowless room could achieve that better, encouraging your patient or client to go within and relax.

#3 – In Feng Shui, the back left corner of the facility or building (from the perspective of the front door) is the Wealth and Prosperity Area or better known as your money zone.

This area is also considered a power position and energetically encourages more respect among your peers. If these things are important to you, then the back windowless room is your best option.

Lastly, I want to address the Feng Shui elephant in the room–those beautiful overhead beams you mention.

While overhead beams might be attractive to look at, energetically and from a Feng Shui perspective they are considered “cutting energy” or conflict energy and can contribute to headaches depending on how much they stand out from the ceiling and if the table is placed directly underneath one of them.

You can easily ascertain if these beams feel heavy by simply standing underneath them and noticing how you feel.

And, of course, there is a remedy for this. Simply paint the beams (with permission) the same color as the ceiling and voilà! That heavy energy has suddenly receded, becoming invisible and lighter as it blends in with the ceiling.

So Janel, based on the information presented here, which one feels best for you, your work and your clientele?

Yours in welcoming and friendly healing spaces,

Cheryl
Image

P.S. I have four people interested in taking my online DIY Waiting Room or Treatment Room Workshop in December. I need 5 people to have a workshop. If there’s enough interest, I’ll include a second one too. If you want more info, send me a quick email here with a thumbs up.

HOW DO I DESIGN A WAITING ROOM THAT KEEPS PATIENTS RETURNING & REFERRING?
x