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Hi Peeps,

So, it turns out it was a good thing I got my hiney over to urgent care the other day when my right middle finger was turning a monkey poop green color.

I found out yesterday I had a staph infection—yikes!

It’s all good though. I’m on the mend with 4 doses of antibiotics a day, along with a healthy dose of probiotics, too.

Here’s a bit more about my experience of being a patient in the exam room during my urgent care visit…

——

My wait to see the doc was very short and for that I was grateful.

I was escorted into the exam room by a very friendly staff person [not a nurse] who took my blood pressure, my temperature and my blood oxygen levels with a fancy all-in-one machine. Super cool!

She asked me a few questions and left me alone to wait for the doc.

I was instantly uncomfortable with the position of the patient chairs—in a direct line with the door–and I felt uneasy in my body.

The overhead fluorescent lighting made things worse. The lighting cast a bright glare below which made me feel like I was about to be interrogated at a police station–the kind I’ve seen on tv.

My head hurt and I focused on my breath.

I distracted myself by looking at my phone.

Suddenly, I heard a loud rap at the door and the doctor [and a nurse-in-training] blew in like a gust of wind on a stormy day.

The doc quickly introduced himself [and the nurse] and asked me a bunch of questions about my finger.

After that the convo went something like this:

Doc: So what do you do for a living?

Me: I design spaces like the one we are in now.

Doc: [Suddenly interested] Really? Exam rooms?

Me: Yes. And I teach people like you how to design exam rooms and other wellness spaces that make docs, patients, nurses and staff feel nurtured and safe.

Doc: [Slowing down] So, I think we’re doing a pretty good job in that department. [Goes onto explain everything they’ve done to make things simply and easy for patients.] What do you think?

Me: [Politely] I think there’s room for improvement.

After that we talked a little bit more about what could be done to improve the space to help patients feel less anxious and more nurtured, safe and comfortable.

And then things quickly moved on to dealing with the issue of my finger.

I’m suddenly at the end of my email [there’s so much to share] but I’ll be back first thing tomorrow morning with more juicy answers to yesterday’s Wellness Design Pop Quiz.

Pinky swear.

xo,

Cheryl
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HOW DO I DESIGN A WAITING ROOM THAT KEEPS PATIENTS RETURNING & REFERRING?
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