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Growing up I spent most of my weekends at Grandma’s house in the Jewish Fairfax District of Los Angeles.

Much of that time was spent in her living room, in front of the old fashioned telly, wrapped in a big soft blanket while snuggled up in her La-Z-boy chair. (Good times.)

About every 7.5 minutes or so, Grandma jumped out of her chair and raced out of the room to complete some urgent household chore I was unaware of.

A few minutes later she returned. And then again, like clockwork, she bolted out of her chair and out of the room as fast as she could to compete her next task.

This was my first introduction to adults and their need for speed.

Like most people in the United States, I’ve been a speed addict for way too long, even though I’m an introvert and live on an enchanted piece of land in northern California. (Nature helps me deeply relax.)

Lately, I’ve been taking my time back in a new way by slowly and intentionally working on the 100 or so waiting room design illustrations for my new book, The Waiting Room Cure, and balancing my time in the design studio with rest and play in the real world (not the virtual one.)

Recently, I worked with a client who doesn’t take any time for herself in between appointments. From the moment this brilliant doc arrives to her office, until the time she leaves, she is on a race through her to-do list of seeing patients and getting work done.

By the time we met in the middle of her day, I felt sandwiched in.

Her eyes glossed over when I started to talk about a new patient centered design to help her reduce stress.

She was simply exhausted and readily admitted that she didn’t know how to relax.

She didn’t know how to take a moment for herself to just breathe during her day.

Speed is an addiction in our culture that many of us are growing tired of.

To detox from speed and take control of your health and your life takes commitment and it’s worth it.

Mental focus comes back, relationships improve, suddenly you have more energy to be present with your patients and yourself. Your business improves.

Here’s a space clearing kit I wrote that teaches you the basics of how to keep your healthcare space peaceful, especially after working with anxious patients, and how to manage your own energy too.

Grab instant access by clicking on the pretty image below:

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Email me here with questions.

Yours in slow delicious breaths,

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HOW DO I DESIGN A WAITING ROOM THAT KEEPS PATIENTS RETURNING &​ REFERRING?
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