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I recently watched Oprah’s latest Super Soul Sunday interview with Brother David Steindl-Rast, a Catholic Benedictine monk, notable for his enduring message about gratefulness as the true source of lasting joy. You can watch the interview here: http://bit.ly/2A7pC5c.

Listening to Brother David’s words about living a grateful lifestyle washed over me like warm sunshine on a spring morning. It felt good. Very good. Like the best kind of good.

One of the stories he shared made me think about your patient-centered office and the gift of comfort and safety you give your patients in every moment they are with you in your space.

Here’s that story:

When Brother David was a young boy in school in his home country of Austria, the country was invaded by the Nazis. The daily bombings still didn’t stop Br. David and his friends from going to school. One day the teacher gave a homework assignment on Monday and said it was due on Thursday. At that moment, the entire class burst out laughing.

“Why did the kids laugh?” Oprah asked.

“When you are concerned about the possibility of a bomb dropping on you at any given moment, you are forced to remain in the present moment. The future doesn’t exist.” answered Br. David. 

The students thought the idea of a homework assignment due a few days into the future was absurd because they didn’t know if they would be alive in a few days since the bombings were coming at random moments. They lived deeply in the present moment.

This taught Brother David at an early age to enjoy and be grateful for every moment of life regardless of the external circumstances.

What does this have to do with your healthcare office?

When you design and decorate your waiting room in a way that appeals to the emotions—relaxing the brain and nervous system, while instilling hope and optimism in the mind–you bring someone in pain or possibly facing a terminal condition into the present moment and out of the panic state that may generally occupy their life.

Your evidence-based art piece hanging on the wall in the waiting room can help someone instantly dive into the immersive scene without you having to say or do anything extra. Your environment has single-handedly taken your patient our of flight-or-fight and into a peaceful, everything-is-going-to-be-okay place.

That’s a big effing deal for the health of your patients and the vitality of your business.

Get started revamping your waiting room in easy step by step instructions —–> http://TheWaitingRoomCure.com.

Yours in relaxing and beautiful spaces,

Cheryl
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HOW DO I DESIGN A WAITING ROOM THAT KEEPS PATIENTS RETURNING & REFERRING?
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